$353,000 in repairs to begin at Kidd Springs Park

 

By Rachel Stone at the Advocate

Construction on two major repair projects totaling about $353,000 are expected to begin soon at Kidd Springs Park.

The two projects will repair an enormous underground culvert, bring the dam up to Texas Commission on Environmental Quality standards and improve the shoreline around the pond.

The most expensive piece is repairing the giant culvert, which will cost $208,000, from 2006 bond funds.

There is limestone about 4-5 feet beneath the soil at Kidd Springs. Many decades ago, a drainage culvert 8 feet wide and 6 feet deep was cut into the limestone, and the culvert was capped with a 4-foot concrete arch. The City of Dallas discovered a few years ago that part of the arch had collapsed, and further investigation found that parts of the limestone walls had eroded.

That’s when the city erected that unsightly chain-link fencing just west of the pool; it’s been there for three years now as a precaution against potential sinkholes. But it will be removed later this year if all goes as planned. Work is expected to begin this month, and it could be completed in October.

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Why Historic Preservation Districts Are Crucial to Cities

 

All across America, from Cleveland and Buffalo to Portland and Pittsburgh, people from all walks of life—led by the young, diverse, millennial generation—are choosing to live, work, and play in historic neighborhoods. When asked why they moved to these areas, residents often talk about the desire to live somewhere distinctive, to be some place rather than no place. They want things like windows that open, exposed brick, and walkable communities, and continually use words like “charm” and “authenticity” to describe what they are looking for. In short, many Americans today want their homes and workplaces to be unique and distinctive—exactly the kind of distinctiveness, character, and sense of place that historic preservation districts provide.

Indeed, historic preservation districts provide benefits to people, whether or not they actually own a home in them. In New York’s Lower East Side, for example, millions of people visit annually to experience a remarkably intact 19th century tenement neighborhood. In Chicago, the annual Historic Pullman Community house tour is among the most popular residential house tours in Illinois, providing a glimpse into the lives of workers in George Pullman’s planned community. These places and thousands of others—from the Milwaukee Avenue Historic District in Minneapolis, to the Harvard-Belmont Historic District in Seattle—provide more than just housing for current residents. They also serve as living history lessons, and tangible reminders of a city’s past. They connect us across time to those who came before us.

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Kiest Pergola Wins Preservation Texas Award

 

The reconstruction of the Kiest Park Pergola in Dallas (originally constructed in 1934) was recognized with a 2016 Honor Award on February 18th.

Cannon's Village Gets Historic Tax Credit Exemption Status


 

Oak Cliff's 1314 West Davis Street a/k/a Cannon's Village awarded Historic Preservation Tax Exemption status. Thank you to Kacy Jones
 and his entire family for this beautiful restoration to 1922!!  Cannon's won the OOCCL 2014 Ruth Chenoweth Preservation Award.

Oak Cliff Landmark and Former At-Risk Property For Sale

 

By Robert Wilonsky at the Dallas Morning News


A 111-year-old Oak Cliff landmark long considered endangered can be yours — for the nice price of $575,000.

Now, in a perfect world, it might be listed for a little less. Barbara Reeves, the RE/MAX agent who has just put the mansion on the market, doesn’t hide the obvious: The gem has faded, and needs some $100,000 worth of work to make it whole again. “Scraped and painted” would be a good enough start, she said Thursday. But just a start.

Still, there is no doubt that it’s an estimable piece of property, 4,100 square feet of history planted on W. Jefferson Boulevard directly across the street from Sunset High School. The Victorian farm house, surrounded by far more modest fare, has but one functioning powder room spread among its myriad bedrooms. But it does boast a third-floor ballroom

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Chalk Hill Trail Coming to Oak Cliff/West Dallas

 

By Rachel Stone for Oak Cliff Advocate

The first section of the City of Dallas’ trail system to reach West Dallas also will be one of its prettiest.

The planned Chalk Hill Trail follows a 3.7-mile path originally cut by the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe Railroad, from the DART station at Wright and Illinois and snakes around to West Davis and Chalk Hill Road. In fewer than four miles, it travels through varied scenery, including residential neighborhoods and forested areas, reaching the chalk cliffs above West Davis.

The trail will be 12 feet wide and paved with 6-inch reinforced concrete. Dallas County is paying $6 million for the trail, and the City of Dallas is paying $100,000 for environmental testing and remediation.

The city is expected to finalize its design for the trail next summer, and construction should being in winter 2017. It should take about a year to complete the trail, so it could be open sometime in 2018.

When it opens, there won’t be lighting or any other amenities along the trail. Fundraising from private “friends of” groups have paid for those extras on the Katy Trail and at White Rock Lake, for example.

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